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August 27, 2014 posted in Recipes

How To Make All Grain Whiskey - The Easy Way

All Grain Whiskey

The final product that comes out of the Clawhammer Supply Moonshine Still is only going to taste as good as the ingredients that went into the mash. An all grain mash will have a better flavor and it will be a lot smoother than sugar shine. Making an all grain mash using the mash in a bag process is not difficult and does not require expensive equipment.

Mashing is simply a process that combines crushed malts with hot water in a mash tun in order to convert complex sugars into simple sugars that are more easily fermented. There are quite a few ways to mash grains including fly sparging, batch sparging, step mashing, and the mash in a bag method. This article will focus on the mash in a bag process as it is the easiest and requires the least amount of equipment.   

The mash in a bag method is the easiest way to mash grains for an all grain mash. In this method, the malted and unmalted grains are added to a mash strainer bag - the mash strainer bag acts as a filter which makes it very easy to remove the grains from the wort at the end of the mash. After the mash is complete, the mash bag is simply lifted out of the mash tun, allowing the wort (the liquid after mashing) to drain back into the kettle.

Equipment Needed

Checkout our equipment guide for equipment recommendations

  • 10 Gallon Mash Kettle (or larger)
  • Mesh Bag For Mashing
  • 6.5 Gallon Fermenter
  • Air Lock
  • Mash Paddle Or Spoon
  • Immersion Chiller ( used to cool the mash )
  • Brewing Thermometer
  • Hydrometer

Mash In A Bag Brew Day Process

  • First, sanitize everything that is going to come in contact with the mash. Cleaning and sanitizing all equipment is the best defense against getting an infection that will contaminate the mash. Use a cleaner such as PBW and a sanitizer such as star-san, and you will decrease your likelihood of a contaminated batch of wash.
  • Add enough star-san solution to the 6.5 gallon fermenting bucket, then add all of the equipment that will come in contact with the mash, including airlocks, mash paddle or spoon, scissors for opening yeast, the paint strainer bag, thermometer, and auto-siphon. Once the mash needs to be transferred to the fermentation bucket, dump the star-san solution to another bucket and use it for any future sanitizing.
  • When doing the mash-in-a-bag process, add all of the mash water at the beginning of the mash.
  • The first step in cooking a mash is to get the mash water up to strike temperature. Strike water temperature is usually 10 to 15·°F higher than the target mash temperature. The strike temperature is higher than the target mash temperature to compensate for the heat loss of the grains and the mash tun.
  • Heat the mash water with either an electric hot plate or a turkey fryer with propane. If using an electric hotplate, use an electric controller to easily regulate the mash temperature.
  • Once the strike water is at temperature, add the mash bag to the mash-tun and then dump the grains into the pot.
  • Once the grains have been added, mix the grains with the mash paddle so there are no clumps or "dough balls".
  • After all of the grains are mixed with the water, check the brewing thermometer and make sure the mash temperature is correct.
  • If the temperature is low, add add heat or boiling water and stir. If the temperature is too hot, add ice and stir.
  • Leave the grains in the mash-tun for 60 to 90 minutes, depending on the recipe.
  • Once done mashing, carefully pull out the mash bag and let the liquid drip back into the pot. A colander placed across the pot works great and saves your arms.
  • Once the liquid has been extracted from the mash bag, insert the immersion chiller and chill the mash to yeast pitching temperature -- normally 70 degrees, but refer to your yeast packet. If you don't have an immersion chiller you can cool the mash with an ice bath.
  • Once the mash has been chilled to yeast pitching temperature, transfer the mash with an auto-siphon to your fermentation vessel.

 

Simple Mash In A Bag Single Malt Whiskey Recipe (5 Gallon Recipe)

    • 7.5 gallons of water
    • 13 Pounds Of Crushed US 2 Row (Pale Malt)
    • Dry Yeast ( Bread Yeast, Safale US-05 Ale Yeast, or any yeast you prefer)
  1. Heat the water in the mash tun to 158F (this is called the strike water)
  2. Once the strike water is at 158F add the mash bag and the crushed grains
  3. Stir the grains with the mash paddle so there are no clumps or "dough balls"
  4. Check the brewing thermometer and make sure the mash temperature is around 150
  5. If the temperature is low, add heat or boiling water and stir. If the temperature is too hot, add ice and stir
  6. Once the mash temperature is close to 150  add the lid and let mash for an hour. Add heat as needed while stirring to keep the temperature around 150
  7. After 60 minutes carefully pull out the mash bag and let the liquid drip back into the pot
  8. Once the wort is done dripping from the mash bag, insert the immersion chiller and chill the mash to yeast pitching temperature -- normally 70 degrees, but refer to your yeast packet. If you don't have an immersion chiller you can cool the mash with an ice bath
  9. Take a hydrometer reading and write down the starting gravity
  10. Once the mash has been chilled to yeast pitching temperature, transfer the mash with an auto-siphon to the fermentation vessel
  11. Add the yeast to fermenter and then add the airlock

 

 

 

 

  • How much yield do you usually get from 5 gallons?

    Posted by Jordan on November 09, 2016
  • Your recipes are great but where the hell can I buy this stuff.Should I call you on the phone to get the info I need????

    Posted by Mike Garitta on May 23, 2016
  • All I see is questions with no way to see answers. I read above where you don’t respond to certain questions. What is the significance of posting all the questions and requests for help on the webpage?

    Posted by greg on March 17, 2016
  • why is copper used rather than steel?

    Posted by John on March 15, 2016
  • why is copper used rather than steel?

    Posted by John on March 15, 2016
  • Still# 1. 7 gal. Mash
    6 scoops cracked corn
    2 scoops 2 row malt barley
    1 scoop rolled barley
    10 lb. sugar
    1 capful yeast nutrient
    3 packets dry ale yeast
    1 1/2 gal corn sours

    Posted by SNeaky PEte on January 03, 2016
  • To make your shine smoother, try running your worm a bit colder,I use a 6’ long condenser vs. a worm,30ga of ice water,frozen milk jugs. The output is usually 55 degrees F. If I’m running 30 gal. I usually add more jugs around qt. # 8. Or make your cuts earlier,jars 5 6 and 7 are usually pretty smooth and tasty.

    Posted by SNeaky PEte on January 03, 2016
  • What are your thoughts on putting copper in the white dog to get rid of the eggy smell?

    Posted by Rikard Roos on September 14, 2015
  • Lee, you gotta just have time in the barrel. One easy way around it is to fill your demi-jon with oAK CHIPS (i DUNNO, A HANDFUL OR SO) AND THE GREATER SURFACE AREA WILL ACCELERATE AGING. nOW PUT THE DEMIJON AWAY AND LET IT SIT FOR A FEW MONTHS MINIMUM.

    yOU CAN ALSO ADD A SMALL AMOUNT OF GLYCEROL (LIKE A TEASPOON AT MOST) TO SMOOTH OUT THE MOUTHFEEL, BUT ITS KINDA CHEATING.

    Posted by sHAYNE on April 13, 2015
  • donnie,
    Try this recipe:
    1 Gal H2o (your choice I’ve used rain water)
    1 Lb cracked corn
    1/2 lb wheat
    1/4 lb rye
    1 lb Sugar

    Bring h2o to boil and add ingredients, stir
    add sugar and stir
    simmer 1.5 hrs- stir intermittently
    turn down/off heat and allow to cool to 150 F
    add 1 cup dry malt and stir
    keep heat around 145 F stirring every 15 min for 2 hrs
    cool to about 75 f then pitch yeast
    pour into fermenter

    Posted by bill on January 24, 2015
  • I am trying to make corn flavored lightening like granpa did last time i seen any was from N.c. was smooth an taste an smelled like corn any help

    Posted by donnie on January 23, 2015
  • If using a fermentation bag, why would you need to syphon your mash into a different vessel for fermentation

    Posted by Jerry Veirauch on January 20, 2015
  • I tried your corn whiskey recipe and had some trouble with it maybe you could give me some pointers I ran it and produced about 4 Quartz but smells like rubbing alcohol threw the run (heads) then got smooth with no alcohol ( tails) I dunno whether I stressed the yeast or no if you have any info that would be nice p.s. I am nnew at running a still

    Posted by mark on December 20, 2014
  • What percentage corn sugar and yeast

    Posted by tom on November 23, 2014
  • Please advise as to how to smooth out my product. I am getting high proof but it just has a harsh first smell and after taste. I has been that way regardless of the recipe be it straight sugar shine or a grain mash.

    Posted by Lee Luft on November 21, 2014

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