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July 31, 2018
Last updated

Juicy NEIPA (New England IPA) Recipe

Owner of Clawhammer Supply
juicy NEIPA Homebrew Recipe

One of the most popular styles of beer that people have been brewing recently is the New England IPA. They're dank, fruity, juicy, hazy, and delicious. Just thinking about them makes us thirsty! We've done a few session versions of the NEIPA, but we decided to take things to another level with this recipe by adding a ton of hops to this beer. Using Clawhammer’s 10.5 gallon Electric Brewing System, we packed this beer full ofsome of the most popular citrus and fruity hops, yielding a juicy, high ABV final product. Read on or watch the video to learn all about our Juicy NEIPA.

Juicy NEIPA Homebrew Recipe Video

Here’s how we made the Juicy NEIPA, read below for full recipe details.

NEIPA Style Guidelines

  • 2018 is the first year The Brewers Association has included a “Juicy or Hazy IPA” in its Beer Style Guidelines
  • Malts with high protein
  • Color & Clarity - Straw to golden colored with a low to high degree of cloudiness
  • Use of fruit-forward hops with a high hop aroma
  • Original Gravity - 1.070 - 1.100
  • High ABV - 6.0% - 8.4%
  • High IBUs - 65 - 100 - with a low perceived bitterness - These IBUs come from late hop additions which provide more aroma than bitterness

Water

The beginning water volume was 7.70 gallons (29.1 liters) and our chemistry was adjusted to have high chloride levels to give us a hazy NEIPA look. Below is our water profile after adjustment. You'll need to add different amounts of minerals to achieve this profile depending on your location, as water chemistry differs from tap to tap. Look up your local water chemistry and use a brewing water chemistry calculator to figure out what you need to add.

  • Calcium: 116.4 ppm
  • Magnesium: 4.0 ppm
  • Sodium: 14.0 ppm
  • Sulfates: 78.6 ppm
  • Chloride: 154.9 ppm
  • Bicarbonates: 25 ppm

Malts

  • Pilsner (2 Row) Ger (2.0 SRM) - 9 lbs (4.1kg) (70.4%)
  • Barley, Flaked (1.7 SRM) - 1 lb 8 oz (680.4g) (11.1%)
  • Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) - 1 lb 8 oz  (680.4g) (11.1%) - High protein, perfect for a NEIPA
  • Wheat, Flaked (1.6 SRM) - 1 lb (.5kg) (7.4%) - High protein, perfect for a NEIPA

pouring malt into grinder

We finely crush all of our malt in a grinder before mashing with it

Mashing

We mashed at 150 degrees Fahrenheit (65.6C) for 60 minutes.

mashing in

Mashing in

Boil

We boiled for 75 minutes. At the 60 minute mark, we added in .5 lb (226.8g) of sugar.

sugar

.5 lb (226.8g) of sugar we threw into the boil

Hops

The most important part to brewing a good NEIPA is the hops. We added all of our hops after the boil. Our first addition happened once we cooled the wort down to 180 degrees Fahrenheit (82.2C).

recirculating using a plate chiller

We use a plate chiller to chill our wort

At 180° F (82.2C) we added 1 oz (28.35g) of

  • Willamette
  • Mosaic
  • El Dorado
  • Citra
  • Centennial

all hops used

All the hop varieties that were used for this beer

one of the many hop additions for this beer

One of the many hop additions this recipe calls for, we add all of our hops to a hop basket

Fermentation

We used the Imperial Yeast Ale Juice A38 to ferment this beer. This yeast is perfect for IPAs and compliments the juicy and fruity flavor of our beer.

pitching yeast

Pitching yeast

Dry Hops

We waited four days until we added our first dry hop addition, ideally you want to wait three days. Fermentation was still active when we did our first addition, that’s a key part to dry hopping a NEIPA. You want to add your first round of dry hops while fermentation is still active.

wort at high krausen - if it looks like this it's still fermenting

If your beer looks like this, fermentation is still active

First Dry Hop Addition

  • 2 oz (56.7g) of Citra
  • 1 oz (28.35g) of Centennial
  • 1 oz (28.35g) of El Dorado
  • 1 oz (28.35g) of Mosaic
  • .25 oz (7.1g) of Willamette

Second Dry Hop Addition (Three Days Later)

  • 2 oz. (56.7g) of Lemondrop

adding hops to mesh bag

We add all of our dry hops to a mesh bag so they can easily be removed

Benchmarks

  • Volume Into The Fermenter - 5.50 gallons (20.8 liters)
  • Original Gravity - 1.060
  • Final Gravity - 1.014
  • ABV - 6%
  • IBUs - 55.3

Tasting Notes

This one definitely met our expectations, at least at first. After it was kegged and carbed up the Juicy NEIPA had a hazy, golden look to it with a really pleasant and fruity aroma. With an ABV of 6%, you couldn’t taste any of the alcohol. The beer had a nice body with a well balanced, smooth, and fruit juicy flavor. The Lemondrop hops we added during our last dry hop addition came through and added a little extra bitterness.

emmet drinking beer

"Super smooth, super juicy..."

However, a couple of weeks later, the fresh "juicy" flavor had faded and the beer was decidedly bitter and tasted a bit unbalanced. One thing we'd probably change for the next round is the Lemondrop hops. We think the beer would be better off with a Citra or Mosaic during our second dry hop addition.

Kyle Brown is the owner of Clawhammer Supply, a small scale distillation and brewing equipment company which he founded in 2009. His passion is teaching people about the many uses of distillation equipment as well as how to make beer at home. When he isn't brewing beer or writing about it, you can find him at his local gym or on the running trail.

  • I brewed this in 2020 and used Raw cane sugar. Cheers

    Posted by Ølmanden on July 05, 2023
  • What type of sugar was added at the 60min mark?

    Posted by Dave on May 02, 2023
  • I am planning on brewing this recipe soon, however I am not sure what kind of sugar you used in the recipe. I would love to know so I can replicate this recipe!

    Posted by Casey voisin on March 02, 2023
  • At what temp and how many psi did you carbonate the juicy neipa?
    Posted by Jonathan on February 10, 2022
  • What type of sugar was added at the 60min mark?

    Thanks

    Posted by Mike on December 02, 2021
  • I brewed this over the weekend and had a few questions I know have been asked but I don’t see any responses. What temperature did you ferment at? What type of sugar did you add (I used whole cane sugar)? And how long did you wait to keg/bottle after the second Dry hop?

    Posted by Eric on November 13, 2021
  • This recipe is for how many litres? 20 litres? 40 litres?

    Posted by Nuno on November 13, 2021
  • Thank YOU FOR THE RECIPE. A QUESTION : IS IT 28.35g OF EACH OF THOSE HOPS OR IS IT THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF THE HOPS (‘’ At 180° F (82.2C) we added 1 oz (28.35g) of ’’)
    Posted by gIANNIS on November 13, 2021
  • My question is about the temperatura range of the fermentation and for how long Was the duration of the first and second fermentation and maturation?
    How long after the second dry hop did you take the beer out of the bucket?
    1. For how long did the first dryhop last, did you take away the hops or leave it until it had fermented finished?
    2. The same question but for the 2nd dryhop.
    Thanks

    Posted by Nickolas on March 17, 2021
  • Love this beer I brewed it and I am drinking it and can not get enough. Great job on the build.

    Posted by Brian on February 19, 2021
  • So I brewed this and have now added in my second dry hop but I still have a pretty thick krausen foam head on the wart. Did you have this issue during the fermentation proccess.

    Posted by Brian on February 08, 2021
  • Wow this looks awesome!
    I only have an 11L glass carboy with a pretty narrow opening so I don’t think I will be able to but a bag of hops in and then remove it later. Can i just throw the hops in and not worry about it?
    Thanks

    Posted by Mackenzie on December 01, 2020
  • My question is about the temperatura range of the fermentation and for how long Was the duration of the first and second fermentation and maturation?
    How long after the second dry hop did you take the beer out of the bucket?
    1. For how long did the first dryhop last, did you take away the hops or leave it until it had fermented finished?
    2. The same question but for the 2nd dryhop.
    Thanks

    Posted by Tõnu on July 28, 2020
  • So I made this beer June 24th and bottled it two week later on July 8th. I’d bought all the ingredients before I read about the oxidation problems you can have with NEIPA beers. I don’t have any keGging equipment or CO2 to evacuate the bottles before capping so I just decided to go ahead and make it and bottle as usual. After reading a bit more about the oxidation problem I decided the only thing I could do was to fill the bottles completely with no head space. I know that some say you’ll get Bottle bombs but others seem to think there is no problem doing this(after 12 days no problem). Some say slower carbonation. Who knows? Some people said to try it early and as soon as it taste ok refrigerate it.
    So after bottling it I put one in the fridge after 3 days and tried it on the 4th. I was surprised how good it was and how carbonated. Not perfect but good for 3 days. Color was very light orange/yellow. It’s not as hazy as the photos of his above. Very hoppy aroma and tasted good though not a lot of hop flavor and not as citrusy as I expected. But really good. I used Beersmith for the recipe and it said 40 IBU for this recipe while he says 55? I feel it has a nice amount of bitterness. Any way I tried another at 7 days and one at 12. All have been really good but not that much more carbonation, but enough. The color has held up too. Could be a slight bit darker but I may not be looking at it in the exact same light. I hope it will last until I finish them all. I’m still worried about oxidation. I’m going to refrigerate them all today as I’m good with the taste. I probably won’t bother with another NEIPA..too much worry.

    Posted by Patrick Coleman on July 20, 2020
  • Do you take the first round of Dry hops out before Adding the second or do you combined them both?

    Posted by Ross on June 16, 2020
  • I see a lot of questions that I would like to know about also but no answers? Are people getting answers by emails?
    I’ve put this recipe in Beersmith and I’m not getting the IBU level anywhere near the 55 you say it is? How do you get them to 55 with doing all the hopping after the boil?

    Thanks
    Pat.

    Posted by Pat on June 15, 2020
  • Hi, a few questions here

    what kind of sugar did you use for the .5 lbs?

    At 180 after the first hop addition , how much time would i wait before transferring to primary fermenter?

    How much priming sugar would i use for a 5.5 gal batch before bottling?

    Thanks!

    Posted by PHilippe on June 08, 2020
  • Hi, i want to ask a question. Do we continue cooling after adding the first hops at 180 fahrenheit? Or are we waiting for a while?

    Posted by Pierre Rivière on March 13, 2020
  • Hi, i want to ask a question. Do we continue cooling after adding the first hops at 180 fahrenheit? Or are we waiting for a while?

    Posted by Pierre Rivière on March 13, 2020
  • “However, a couple of weeks later, the fresh “juicy” flavor had faded and the beer was decidedly bitter and tasted a bit unbalanced."

    Hi,
    Could this “Fad off” be caused by oxidation due to possible presence of oxygen throug late fase of fermentation (introduced by Second dry hopping), kegging or bottling.
    i THINK OXYGEN IS A DEVIL IN HIGH HOPPED BEER AND REDUCE STORAGETIME.
    i WILL USE A PRESURE FERMENTOR SYSTEM AND COUNTER PRESSURE BOTLE FILLING TO AVOID INTRODUCTION OF OXYGEN.

    cAN ANYONE WITH EXPERIONS ON THAT MAKE A COMMENT ABOUT THE FALL OUT?

    bEST REGARDS jEAKILLIE

    Posted by jeakillie on February 24, 2020


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