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April 17, 2020

Norwegian Pale Ale Homebrew Recipe

nordic pale ale recipe

We brewed a pale ale homebrew beer using one-of-a-kind yeast from an old brewing barrel on a farm in Norway. Sound somewhat random? That's because it is. One of our Instagram followers messaged us and explained how he harvested and cultivated his yeast sample and then asked if we wanted some. A unique yeast strain harvested from an old brewing barrel? Yes, please.

Here's the video for folks who don't read good. Full recipe below.

Brewing system

We used Clawhammer's 10.5 gallon brew in a bag 120 volt home brew system for this brew day.

Water

  • 7.3 gallons

filling a brew kettle with water

Water Chemistry

We adjusted our water to match the "yellow balanced" profile on Bru'n Water.

  • Calcium 50ppm
  • Magnesium 7ppm
  • Sodium 5ppm
  • Sulfate 75ppm
  • Chloride 60ppm

Grains

  • 8lbs 12oz Pale Malt
  • 1 lb Flaked Wheat
  • 8oz. Crystal 20
  • 8 oz. Crystal 60

Mashing in - pale ale grain bill

grains on a mash paddle

Mash Temp

  • 152F / 67C for 60 minutes

Boil & Hops

  • 60 minute boil
  • 1 ounce (28 grams) of Palisade Hops at 60 minutes

Adding Palisade hops to brew kettle

Yeast

  • Unique strain of saccharomyces cerevisiae. We did make a yeast starter for this recipe since the yeast was not professionally cultured and was somewhat old.
  • Fermentation temp 66F (19C)

pitching saccromyces servasis brewing yeast

yeast starter

fermentation refrigerator

Tasting

This one looked pretty awful but tasted pretty great right out of the gates, but honestly, it went downhill shortly after we did the tasting. We're not sure why / how it changed, but it definitely had a "homebrew" quality to it (not a compliment) shortly after tasting. In either case, this is a solid pale ale grain bill and adding  off the shelf yeast and more hops to it definitely makes for a solid beer. We've done exactly that for an upcoming brew day.

tasting homebrew

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